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Human Energy Systems | Activity 2.2

Activity 2.2: Expert Groups: Analyzing Large Scale Data (45 min)

In new “expert” groups, four students analyze data from one large-scale phenomenon. Students become an “expert” in this area before returning to explain this to their home groups in the next activity.

Materials You Provide

  • Jigsaw Cards (already distributed during previous activity)

Resources Provided

Setup

Print one copy of the Expert Group Worksheets (A,B,C,D) for each student in each expert group. For example, print one copy of Activity 2.2 Expert Group A Worksheet for each student in Group A. Reserve or provide one computer with an internet access for each expert group. You may choose to have duplicate groups (e.g., Expert Groups B1 and B2) and if so you will need to prepare extra materials and a computer for each group.

Directions

1. Have students recall their home groups.

Have students regroup in their home groups from the previous activity. Each student should have a jigsaw card with the same picture and different letters. Review briefly the difference between “generalizability,” “representation,” and “short-term variability and long term trends” from the previous activity.

Assessment

Before leaving their expert groups each individual should be able to address the three considerations for large-scale data for their particular phenomena and be ready to explain it to others.  Use the 2.2 Assessing the Expert Group Worksheets to assess the student’s ideas. At this point, the students may have questions about the phenomenon in their groups, and at the end of the activity they will have had no formal support from you as a teacher in understanding these phenomenon. We recommend looking over their worksheets to see how well they were able to navigate the data in their expert groups. You will also have a chance in the next activity to formatively assess their ideas when they share their expertise with their home groups.

Modifications

  • See notes on the first page of the Jigsaw Cards for instructions about how to distribute cards to different group sizes.

Extending the Learning

Have students research any other forms of representations of data related to their phenomena. They might be surprised to discover how many different ways there are to represent the same data.